Antique Map:  U.S. Coast Survey City of San Francisco and its Vicinity, 1859
Antique Map:  U.S. Coast Survey City of San Francisco and its Vicinity, 1859
Antique Map:  U.S. Coast Survey City of San Francisco and its Vicinity, 1859
Antique Map:  U.S. Coast Survey City of San Francisco and its Vicinity, 1859
Antique Map:  U.S. Coast Survey City of San Francisco and its Vicinity, 1859
Antique Map:  U.S. Coast Survey City of San Francisco and its Vicinity, 1859
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Load image into Gallery viewer, Antique Map:  U.S. Coast Survey City of San Francisco and its Vicinity, 1859
Load image into Gallery viewer, Antique Map:  U.S. Coast Survey City of San Francisco and its Vicinity, 1859
Load image into Gallery viewer, Antique Map:  U.S. Coast Survey City of San Francisco and its Vicinity, 1859
Load image into Gallery viewer, Antique Map:  U.S. Coast Survey City of San Francisco and its Vicinity, 1859
Load image into Gallery viewer, Antique Map:  U.S. Coast Survey City of San Francisco and its Vicinity, 1859

1859 U.S. Coast Survey City of San Francisco and its Vicinity California.

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By: United States Coast Survey

Date: 1859 (dated) Washington D.C.

Dimensions: 24 x 34.5 inches (61 x  87.5 cm)

This is a fine example of the U.S. Coast Survey map of San Francisco published just ten years after the Forty-Niner emigration spurred by the discovery of gold in the nearby foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. During that ten year period, the population of the city had grown exponentially from less than 1,000 to over 50,000 residents from all walks of life. This almost immediate emergence of San Francisco as the most densely populated metropolis on the west coast brought the need for updated maps such as this one.

The map shows the city and surrounding area oriented to the west with North indicated on the right hand side of the sheet. The growing city is shown to extend some eleven blocks from the water with many new buildings scattered about the hills where roads have not yet been laid. The vicinity spans out enough to include the Pioneer and Union Race Courses, Rancho de San Miguel, Black Point where Fort Mason would one day be located, and just to the south a series of farms along a wide road that would one day become Pacific and Presidio Heights.

The topography is shown with incredible detail by innumerable curved lines illustrating contours of the hills set at 20 feet apart with the heights of hill summits noted throughout. Depth soundings are provided within the dotted line up to 18 feet and the expressed in fathoms beyond. Within the right hand side of the map is a "Table or Reference of Public Buildings," that corresponds to the map, locating churches, schools, theatres, hospitals, and a variety of government buildings.

This map is an updated revision from an earlier state published in 1857. It includes more accurate data on topography and hydrography executed in 1857-1858. The topography was overseen by A.F. Rodgers, the Hydrography by R.M. Cuyler, and the entire work was done under the direction of Superintendent A.D. Bache.

Condition: This map is in B condition with separations along the folds. The map retains ample margins on all sides but the left where it shows some loss to the neatline. The entire map has been linen-back for preservation and presentation purposes and presents itself with exceptional eye appeal. 

Inventory #12041

1932 S. Halsted St. #200 Chicago, IL 60608 | P: (312) 496 - 3622

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